Keeping bees on Long Island since 1949.

From the Editor's Desk: November 2017

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The record breaking temperatures in the month of October kept our bees flying so many days. I hope they were finding some good forage. I gave my ladies a nice supply of fondant and they seemed very happy to receive it. Hopefully they got into a nice cluster before the cold night hit.

Meanwhile all my honey is ready to go to the Christmas Fair at my church this Saturday, lotion bars, lip balms, lotions and soaps have my garage smelling of peppermint and cinnamon and vanilla. Gift bags made adorned with chenille bees. Load the car tomorrow and hope for a successful sale.

We welcome more new beekeepers to the club this month: John Mauceri, Brian White, Scott Muller,and John Moss



Please check your email and spam file for the 2018 bee conference survey sent on Nov. 12, and take a few minutes to complete it for the club? We would like to have the results in by 11/20 in time for the meeting!


Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST! Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com, LIBC

December 3rd: Holiday Party

The LONG ISLAND BEEKEEPERS CLUB
Cordially Invites You to Our
ANNUAL HOLIDAY PARTY
December 3, 2017
At 2:00 p.m.
Pace’s Steak House
325 Smithtown By-Pass Hauppauge, NY 11788

Cost is $30.00 per person

Please R.S.V.P. by November 28
th to Joan Mahoney, Treasurer, at (631) 667-5339

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, November 26, 2:00

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Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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From the Editor's Desk: October 2017

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Sitting at the reception desk at the conference Deb and I got to greet so many members and other beekeepers who attended. What a great chance to meet lots of new faces and renew some old friendships. We received many wonderful comments during the day of how successful the conference was going. It was heartwarming to know that the hard work by our board during the past year had made another successful conference possible for Long Island Beekeepers.
We welcome some new members to the club: Josephine Mascolo, Kaylie Hausknecht, John Dzwlewicz, Walter and Mary Scott, Jonathan Kampfer, Dai Dayton
  
Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.


Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST!  
Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com, LIBC

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, September 24, 2:00

Guest Speaker: Dr. Deborah A. Delaney, Assistant Professor of Entomology at University of Delaware


Annual Honey Judging Contest
Doors open at 1:45, the meeting starts promptly at 2:00
Our honey judging contest isn’t just limited to extracted honey, it also includes comb honey, creamed honey, chunk honey, beeswax, mead, honey cookery, arts and crafts, and gadgets. You can see the entire list of products and rules here.

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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From the Editor's Desk: September 2017

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I finally finished extracting and bottling all my honey and ended up with two 2 ounce bears left over, filled every jar I had in the honey house. A wonderful harvest and I went out and thanked my ladies for their good work and the great prize of Best Tasting Dark Honey. What a thrill that was. Now this weekend will be to clean the garage, it has been a real challenge dodging bees every time I go in and out. It is amazing how quickly the bees know the door is open and they sense the drops of honey are there for them to clean up and they buzz right in.
Then next week I have to get my entries ready for the honey judging contest. Don’t forget to prepare your honey properly. NO LABELS! No fingerprints, bring a spare lid, and MAKE SURE YOU ARE A MEMBER IN GOOD STANDING. USE PAYPAL!

 

We welcome new members to the club, Michael Zicolella, Guy and Monica Zicolella, Nancy Vazquez, Nancy Voyles, Karen Luciano, Daniel Raynor, Anthony and Laura Iaconetti,
   Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST!  Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com, LIBC

Hallockville Museum Farm 37th Annual Country Fair: Bee Club Ambassadors Needed

We still have spots open to represent the LIBC at this event please call Rick at 631-445-6266 to volunteer and more information.

Note: This is an educational event. Honey will NOT be allowed to be sold at our booth.

Dates and Times
September 9th & 10th
10am to 5pm

Hallockville Museum Farm
6038 Sound Avenue
Riverhead, NY 11901
Phone: 631-298-5292
http://hallockville.com/

Long Island Fair at Old Bethpage: Bee Club Ambassadors Needed

We still have spots open to represent the LIBC at this event please call Rick at 631-445-6266 to volunteer and more information.

NOTE: This will be an educational event however we WILL be able to sell our honey at an agreed upon price. $1 per jar will be donated to the club.

Dates and Times
Saturday September 16th 10am-6pm
Sunday September 17th 10am-6pm
Saturday September 23rd 10am-6pm
Sunday September 24th 10am-6pm

Long Island Fair
Old Bethpage Village Restoration
1303 Round Swamp Road
Old Bethpage, New York 11804

https://www.lifair.org/
Long Island Fair Office: 516-874-0502
Old Bethpage Village Restoration: 516-572-8401

2017 Beekeeping Classes

Information on beekeeping classes can be found here on our website.

The Lady in the Hive

By George B. Schramm

(With apologies to Raymond Chandler and Philip Marlowe.)

It looked like another dark and stormy night. So I took off my wet sunglasses and squinted at the bright sunshine of a cool spring day. The Kingsley Apiary was, and is, on Olive Street, near Sixth, on the west side. The garden in front of it had a fresh coating of immaculate green sod. A hatless pale man with a face like a halibut was planting dandelions into the sod and looking as if it was breaking his heart.

I went past him through an arcade of wisteria into a small field with short white columns scattered about. Tiny yellow and black dots moved about on the stages in front of each column like little girls at a dancing class. A neat little blonde sat off in a far corner on a small bench under the shade of maple and well out of harm's way.

She wore black slacks and under the unzipped white jacket a dark yellow shirt and a silk scarf of lighter shade around her neck. The edges of the hive tool in the breast pocket looked sharp enough to slice bread. She wore a linked bracelet and no other jewelry. In front of the pushed back white veil her gold hair was parted and fell in loose but not unstudied waves. She had a smooth ivory skin and rather severe eyebrows and large gray eyes that looked as if they might warm up at the right time and in the right place.

I held out my plain card, the one without the honeybee in the corner, and asked to see B. Kingsley. She looked down at the card and pretending to ignore it said: "Have you an appointment?"

"No appointment."

"It is very difficult to see Ms. Kingsley without an appointment." That wasn't anything I could argue about.

"What is the nature of your business, Mr….?"

"Personal."

"I see. Does Ms. Kingsley know you, Mr….?"

"I don't think so. She may have heard my name."

I grinned at her and said, "But maybe the best way to find out is to ask her."

"I don't like your manner," she said in a voice you could have cracked an acorn on. But there was a little sly laughter behind her eyes now.

"That's all right," I said. "I'm not selling it." She reared back as if I had hung a week-old mackerel under her nose. After a moment she stood up turned her back on me and said over her shoulder: "I’m Ms. Kingsley and I'll give you exactly three minutes. God knows why."

Beatrice Kingsley marched briskly behind one of the gleaming white hives and pulled a shiny smoker out of a copper and mahogany box, shoved in a handful of pine needles and lit it with a large butane lighter. She took her time about it. It didn't matter about my time. When she had finished this, she pumped a little smoke into the air and said: "I'm a busy woman. I don't fool around. I take great pride in my apiary and my expertise as a beekeeper. You're a licensed inspector your card says. Show me something to prove it." I got my wallet out and showed her things to prove it. She looked at them and slapped them away with the back of her hand. The celluloid holder with the license in it fell to the ground. She didn't bother to apologize.

"Everything is jake," I said. "You can check on it."

"Not necessary. I guess you might do, but don't get flip with me. And remember when I hire a man he's my man. He does exactly what I tell him and he keeps his mouth shut. Or he goes out fast. Is that clear? I hope I'm not too tough for you."

"Why not leave that an open question?" I said.

She frowned. She said sharply: "What do you charge?"

"Twenty-five a day and expenses."

"Absurd," she said. "Far too much. Fifteen a day flat. That's plenty." I said nothing. She seemed a little surprised that I said nothing.

She leaned over the hive and pointed with her smoker. "I haven't hired you yet," she said, "but if I do, the job is absolutely confidential. No talking it over with your inspector friends. Is that understood?"

"Just what do you want done, Ms. Kingsley?"

"What do you care? You do all kinds of inspection work, don't you?"

"Not all kinds. Only the fairly honest kinds." She stared at me level-eyed, her jaws tight. Her gray eyes had an opaque look.

"For one thing I don't count drones," I said. "And I get a hundred down as a retainer - from strangers."

"Well, well," she said, in a voice suddenly soft. "Well, well."

"And as for your being too tough for me," I said, "most girls start out either by crawling down my shirt or stinging me to show who's boss. But usually they end up very reasonable - if they're still alive."

"Well, well," she said again, in the same soft voice, and went on staring at me. "Do you lose very many of them?' she asked.

"Not if they treat me right," I said.

"Have a hive tool," she said.

I took a hive tool out of the copper and mahogany box and put it in my pocket.

"I want you to find my queen," she said. "She's been missing for a month."

"Okay," I said. "I'll find your queen." She patted her smoker with her left hand and quickly pulled it away while a hissing sound escaped from between her lips. She stared at me solidly. "I think you will at that," she said. Then she grinned. "I haven't been burned like that in four years."

I didn't say anything.

She ran a hand through her thick gold hair. "She's been gone a whole month," she said. "From that hive over there." She tilted her head and my gaze followed the direction she indicated. Out of the corner of my eye I saw the burnt fingers of her left hand go into her mouth.

"What have you done about it?" I asked.

“Nuffing. Nuf a fing...”

I reached over and gently pulled the fingers from her mouth. Her eyes apologized.

"Nothing. Not a thing. I haven't even been in there." She waited, wanting me to ask why.

I nodded, gathered my exhibits together from the grass and put them away in my pockets. "There are more angles to this than I can even see now," I said as I lifted the smoker from her grip. I walked over to the hive and started to do what she was paying for.

The sun wasn’t much higher in the sky when a small droplet of water fell from the tip of my nose and stained the hive cover as I adjusted it into place. From behind me a voice laughed “Given up already?” A sharp cold laugh. I turned slowly.

She still had the white jacket on. She stood with her back to the sun. Her gold hair had a faint halo. “No,” I said, “I found what I was looking for.”

"Your queen is dead" I said. "If it's any news to you." Ms. Kingsley stared at me and moistened her lips. I lifted my hand and between my thumb and finger was the elongated abdomen of a queen bee, but nothing more of it.

“How dare you” she hissed. “I didn’t pay you to kill her with your bumbling.” She started to advance towards me with anger in her hips.

Before she could take the second step I was at her side. My left arm wrapped around her waist pinning her right arm against my stomach. She let out a small choked sound and her left hand came up to claw at me. I caught her wrist and began to twist it behind her back. As I dropped my right hand I let go of her wrist and yanked the hive tool out of her breast pocket.

Her body went limp and her whole weight sagged against the arm that was around her waist. Her eyes were staring at the hive tool when her face writhed against my chest and I think she was trying to scream.

There on the gleaming edge of the tool was the head and crushed thorax of a queen bee. Her diaphanous wings twinkling slightly in the breeze.

Ms. Kingsley’s moist eyelids dropped closed as I undid the scarf around her ivory neck. The silk square fell out of my hand and fluttered down into the grass between two hives. I guided her sobbing frame gently onto the lawn crushing a dandelion beneath her. I laid the hive tool down beside her.

As I headed back toward the arcade of wisteria I glanced back at something. Something that had once been a queen.

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, August 27, 2:00

Presentation: Summer and Fall Hive Management In Your Apiary - Things to Consider


Also, the LIBC 2017 Best Tasting Honey Contest


Contest Guidelines
  • There are two categories: dark honey and light honey
  • Only one entry per apiary
  • Bring an unlabeled jar with enough honey for members to taste (1/2 pound minimum)
  • There will be four tables of honey to taste, and attendees will vote to select one winner from each table
  • To determine the winning jars, judges will be selected from members who are not participating and will select one winner in each category
  • Winners get a plaque and bragging rights
  • Please try to arrive at the meeting early, between 1:30 and 2:00, to enter your honey

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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Sunday, August 27: Beekeeping 101

Interested in beekeeping, but not sure of what's involved? Attend our free beekeeping for new-bees class: Beekeeping 101.
Before our regular monthly meeting, from 1:00 to 1:45, you can learn some of the basics of beekeeping and find out if it's right for you.
Our meetings are held at
Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
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From the Editor's Desk: August 2017

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A big THANKS to Joe Matza for helping me harvest my honey today, lifting the honey supers is the hardest part of beekeeping for me. The bees really fooled me, moving the honey around so what I thought were three full supers per hive had lots of empty frames. I’ll start extracting tomorrow and find out how much I really have. Not as much as last year I think. Lots of bees followed us into the garage, so I grabbed a few for some apitherapy in my knees. They itch right now, trying not to scratch! Now to get everything ready for the Honey Judging Competition!
We welcome new members to the club, Julie Cummings-Bosch, Nicole LaBarbera, Sheila Stocker, Janet Brinton, John Mattick, Robin Bahnsen and Michael Schroeher.
   Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST!  Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com, LIBC


 
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Congratulations to Moira Alexander who is our Newest Master Beekeeper! We are VERY PROUD OF YOU!


 

Letters to the Editor:
 
Hi Conni, 
Just a suggestion, but this may be a good time to introduce club members to the Holst Milk test. I learned it from Ray Lackey in his bee classes - simple test. Attached is a pdf for the homemade test and a link to a test kit sold by Mann Lake. I found the Holst test pretty easy to use...done it twice and thankfully no positive results. I have not tried the Mann Lake test..
https://www.mannlakeltd.com/afb-test-kit-american-foulbrood
George Lehmuller
 
To Conni:
From John DeNatale
Thought you would enjoy this!
Subject: From egg to the air:                               
21 days of bee development condensed into one mesmerising minute:
http://tinyurl.com/y7y77yea  

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, July 23, 2:00

HONEYBEE SOCIAL


Rain or Shine
In addition to a plant sale and barbecue there will be our annual BEE SWAP.

You can bring bee related items and either sell them or swap them...
All items must have a tag with your name and asking price.
We will have tables setup outside for you to display the items for sale.

The club will provide the hamburgers, hot dogs, water and ice tea.
We will also have some snacks to get the party started.
In addition we will have veggie burgers and we will brew a pot of coffee for the desert table.

If you would like to come please contact MOIRA at Ramoi@aol.com
The deal is if your last name ends in A-L you bring a salad
If your last name ends in M_Z you bring a dessert to share....

You may BYOB ...beer or wine... Realize that the club is not condoning drinking and driving. ;-)

WE NEED PORTABLE BARBECUES FOR COOKING

Hope to see you there and PLEASE no one is allowed to talk about varroa...
Wear your club t-shirt for a group photo, or at least wear a smile!

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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From the Editor's Desk: July 2017

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Much thanks to fellow beekeepers who are helping me with the lifting, Steve, Lorraine, Jim and Don so I have been able to do my mite check (very few) and treat, remove the treatment and check the one poor hive. That one seems to be a drone factory, either a laying worker or poorly fertilized queen. It did give us a good opportunity to examine for mites looking at all the drone brood, no mites. Wish I had some chickens to feed the larvae to. We have one more plan to try to save the hive, keep tuned. The other ladies are happily buzzing.
More new members joined this month, please welcome Astor Apiaries, Kevin Pain, Michael Moroney, Jeffrey Denecke, Ronald Williamson, Janet Gemmell, Anne Hansen, Edward Hague, Barbara and Frank Johnson.

Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters. Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com,

Annual Greater New York Bee Conference - Hosted by the LIBC

5th Annual Long Island Honey Bee Conference
Hosted by the Long Island Beekeepers Club
Sunday, October 8, 2017
 
Farmingdale State College
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale NY 11753
Roosevelt Hall Student Union

Registration and Sign In 8:30
  9:00 to 3:45

Price $65
Raffles and Door Prizes
Includes Continental Breakfast, Coffee Break, Lunch






Quantity of Tickets




 
Speakers
Jennifer Berry
Keeping Bees Alive: Part 1
Keeping Bees Alive: Part 2
 
Clarence H. Collison
Examining Comb: What Do They Tell You?
Queen Biology and Problems

Nicholas L. Naeger
The Fungal Pharmacy: Using fungi to combat varroa and viruses in the hive
Everybody Wants to be Queen: Lessons from queenless workers on managing group conflict
 
Bee Supply Companies Attending
Bee Smart
Betterbee
Mann Lake
Dadant
Brushy Mountain
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From the Editor's Desk: June 2017

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Checked my hives today, two of the three were ready for a second honey super. The third needs another few days. The ladies were very busy and happy, the nice warm weather has definitely been an improvement in their mood. I have a new lawn company so I am supplying him with a veil if needed now that they are so much more active. My first varroa mite roll was great, only one mite found in each hive. Going to schedule another one soon.
I’m running out of superlatives for each meeting. Another great attendance, new members, let’s welcome Larry Gentile, James Foote, Fabio Ferreira, Ellen Jeanne Dwyer, Kate Glinert, and Townsend Weeks.

Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters. Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com,

AMERICAN FOULBROOD IDENTIFIED LOCALLY

Club members...
Donal Peterson was called to an apiary in Central Islip by a beekeeper that realized that something was not right in his beeyard. Donal inspected his hives and found characteristics of AFB in 4 of the 6 colonies. He contacted Paul Cappy, the NYS Head Apiarist, and a bee inspector will be sent to LI to confirm the ABF disease and assist in the elimination of the colonies within that apiary.

We are asking that beekeepers in the Central Islip, Hauppauge and the Islip areas to look for signs and symptoms of this brood disease:
  • Irregular brood pattern
  • Larvae turned from light brown to dark brown
  • Larvae die upright not twisted in cell
  • Cappings are sunken and punctured
  • Surface of cappings are moist or wet rather than dry
  • Dried out brood or scales adhere to the bottom or the cell wall
  • Scales are difficult to remove
  • Dead pupae have their tongues protruding at a right angle to the scale, or straight up
  • An unpleasant putrid "foul brood" odor which can be detected in the apiary or hive

Please use your beekeeping books to reread information about this disease so you are knowledgeable about what you are seeing within your colonies....Please use your tools only in your own colonies...Please do not share equipment until we determine that this is a sole location...

If you have a colony within your apiary that has AFB characteristics please call Donal Peterson who will come to check your hives so that we can contain this brood disease...
DONAL PETERSON: 631-827-1810

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, May 28, 2:00

Chris Cripps, Owner of Better Bee


What To Do If Your Bees Are Sick: Antibiotics in the hive, brood disease, varroa, and where to look for a veterinarian

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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From the Editor's Desk: May 2017

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The bees are so happy today, sunny, hot, the rain is gone for a few days, flowers blooming all over. Now beekeeper has to check for mites and add a honey super.
We welcome more new members: Katherine Redman, Jon Lochner, Kathleen Rezler, GardenFork Media LLC, Douglas Poat, and Maggie Kirwin.

Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters. Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com,

EAS 2017 Annual Conference

EAS 2017: University of Delaware, Newark DE, July 31 - August 4
Eastern Apiculture Society’s Annual Conference takes will be hosted by the University of Delaware, Clayton Hall Conference Center. Everything is in one big area from cafeteria to meeting rooms to vendors to shows and of course the program itself.
Presenters include: Jennifer Berry, Michael Palmer, Tom Seeley, Marla Spivak, Jay Evans (USDA), Jim Tew,Tammy Horn, Bart Smith, Maryann Frazer, Kim Flottum, Vince Aloyo,

There will be excellent speakers and variety from the very practical beekeeping to the more scientific bee talks. The short course will have a beginner, an intermediate and more advanced beekeeping tracks. Conference mornings will feature our award winners and keynoters of note and the afternoon will feature several options for workshops. We will have an auction night event on Thursday and our banquet on Friday night on-site. Tours will include some of the outstanding DuPont property mansions and gardens of the area. Or stroll over to the beeyard for a look at our local colonies.

http://easternapiculture.org/conferences/eas-2017/2017-registration.html

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, April 23, 2:00

Jennifer Tsuruda: Behavioral Resistance to Varroa


Originally from California, Jennifer has been studying honey bees for over 15 years. She received her PhD at the University of California at Davis and was a postdoc researcher at Purdue University (in Indiana) and has studied honey bee foraging behavior, reproductive physiology, behavioral resistance to mites, and genomic imprinting.
Since joining Clemson University as SC’s Apiculture Specialist in 2014, she has been organizing and speaking at beekeeping meetings, developing training programs, guest lecturing, participating in field days, holding outreach events, and advising the SC Beekeepers Association & the SC Farm Bureau’s Apiculture Committee. She has been working on pollinator protection with Clemson’s Regulatory Services and has a research project on the effects of systemic insecticides on honey bees in ornamental plant landscapes.
Active in the academic and beekeeping communities, Jennifer serves as past President of the American Association of Professional Apiculturists, Vice-Chair of the Heartland Apicultural Society, and past member and chair of the Entomological Society of America’s Student Transition and Early Professionals Committee. Clemson is quickly becoming her home and she looks forward to developing her career in SC and sharing her enthusiasm for honey bees.

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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From the Editor's Desk: April 2017

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It was so exciting to see bee poop on my windshield yesterday! John hived his package on Sunday and his girls checked out their new property and made sure to mark my car so I knew that they were there! The new plastic cages are very nice and light and so much easier to get all the bees out than the old wood and wire mesh ones.
I am looking forward to receiving my nucs, hopefully next week so the air will be buzzing soon. The flowers are calling, I have daffodils that aren’t the most interesting, still have crocuses, but the hellebore is blooming nicely. They are hard to see the bees since I have the Lenten variety which is purple and the bees don’t show up as easily. I should plant another variety.
I think last month’s meeting was an overwhelming winner with 120 members attending! The line of new members and members renewing their membership before the deadline was amazing. We welcome these new members: John Lesser, Steven Schwartz, Ginger Dammann, Alexandra Johnson, Jonathan Albright, Richard Desney, Pat Zoll, John & Colleen Riley, Matthew & Katina Bertolino, Chris Gartung, Ed Mirasol, Peggy Coyle, Patricia McLaughlin, and Steven Niggles.

Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly.

From the Editor's Desk: March 2017

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Standing Room Only at the last meeting. Great meeting with excellent speaker. Lots of wonderful information at Beekeeping 101 with many new beekeepers checking in. Some are looking for mentors, so if you get a call from some of these new members, please give them help when you can. Remember what it was like when you were a newbee! Welcome to the club Simon Bromberg and family, Tore Wubbenhorst, Troy Nelson, Fanny Silva, Matt Francisco, Caitlyn & Mike Hanft, Christopher Gee Jr. Maria Tom, Jay Borow, John Tietjen, Ronald Williamson, Amanda Oswald, Pam Donovan, Judith Pittigher, Edward Otero, Ed McGarr, and Mohammad Khan.


Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly.

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, March 26, 2:00

Emma Mullen, Honey Bee Extension Associate at Cornell University


Ms. Mullen will be presenting information on the new NYS Master Bee Program and about her research project involving pesticides, viruses, mites and nosema using management practices from 60 beekeepers in NY.

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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Introduction to Beekeeping Seminar

March 15, 2017
6:00pm – 7:30pm

No fee – all welcome

Presenter: Master Beekeeper Chris Kelly, Promised Land Apiary

At:
Talmage Farm Agway
1122 Osborn Avenue
Riverhead NY 11901

Please RSVP to agway@talmagefarm.com or call 631.727.3100

From the Editor's Desk: February 2017

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Another fantastic meeting with lots of new members. We welcome to the club: Bhivani and Joe Jaroff, Lauren Walsh, Colin Sealy, Stephanie Arroyo and Joseph Pilkington, Bruce Talmage, Peter Kohlmann, Alexandra Hurley and Kerry Reetz.

Please remember your dues are due in January, and to prevent long lines at that meeting a check in the mail or PAYPAL ahead of time is GREATLY appreciated.
Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.

Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly.

2017 Hive Sterilization Irradiation Event

If you have dead out equipment, bought used equipment, or had colony contract American FoulBrood or another disease that will carry over to this spring and infect your bees you should take part in the 2017 hive irradiation sterilization program.

You will need to deliver your hive equipment to Sterigenics at 75 Tilbury Road, Salem, NJ 08078on Monday March 13th at about 11:00 A.M. For more information please see the attached document. For the full details on how to participate, the cost, and view the video on how to prepare and palletize your equipment go to http://www.montcopabees.org/services-resources/irradiation/ .

This process allow you to sterilize hive boxes, frames, wax, honey and pollen and safely put it back into your operation without the risk of infecting new bees or spreading disease in your apiary. Be safe not sorry for your bees.

Thank you.

Mark Antunes
Montgomery CountyPA Beekeepers
PennsylvaniaBeekeepers
484-955-0768
honeyhillfarm@verizon.net

From the Editor's Desk: January 2017

blogEntryTopper
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
I had a great holiday visiting my son and his family in California, just outside of Los Angeles. One afternoon I spent an hour photographing honeybees on the huge jade plant in the garden. The fragrance was amazing and the girls were enjoying collecting the nectar. That evening we spent some time exploring the new microscope my grandkids got for Christmas. Here is a picture of 4 year old Mia examining the leg of a honeybee from a prepared slide. It was lots of fun.
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I have received a few renewals for membership 2017 but a large number of new members. We welcome Thomas Glover, Jennifer Krauss, Sheila Routh, Giuseppina Mannino, Kevin Gersh, Isabelle Salvaterra, Joseph Campanella, Cynthia Chapman, Diana Cristiano, Martin & Barbara Haerter, Lori & Carmine Mileo, Aluce Taudel, Robert Mozer, Bremelin Romero, Patricia Sheehan & family, Alex Lieberman-Cribbin, Bernard Kennedy, Jane Testa, Fermin Ortiz, Jane Kosovsky, Carissa Herb,and Brian Breult,
Most of these new members paid via Paypal which is very convenient, however it did not give me personal information, address and phone number. I would appreciate it if these new members could email me with this information for our data base. Thanks.

 
 
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A new Honeybee has arrived at the Breault Apiary! Welcome to Seren who was born Dec 17th, 7lbs 15ozs 20in! Congratulations from the rest of the hives!
 
Please remember your dues are due in January, and to prevent long lines at that meeting a check in the mail or PAYPAL ahead of time is GREATLY appreciated.
   Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.
 
Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads. See the notice from Moira at the end of the newsletter.

The Garden Column

By Lorraine Leacock, Master Gardener
(Courtesy Cornell Cooperative Extension)

January in the garden...brrr...but Snowdrops, Galanthus, camouflage in the landscape and burst through the frozen soil, delighting both gardener and honey bee.  These tough-as-nails perennial bulbs are easy to grow and ideal to plant surrounding your hives for those rare 50 degree mid winter day cleansing flights...your girls will appreciate the fresh nectar and pollen source the blooms can supply. There are 168 varieties listed on garden.com, The National Gardening Association’s plant database. 
 
I was lucky enough to have these pop up in my garden from a prior owner 25 years ago. Having never touched them, they emerge every year like clockwork.  The foliage will disappear in the summer so you can layer with other perennials, annuals or ground cover...or position in a woodland/wild area and just let nature take over. 
 
Put this on your to-do list for the fall:  Acquire bulbs to plant 2-3” deep, 3” between (they will multiply) in full sun to light shade where they will receive light to moderate moisture...may I say as close to your colonies as possible :)
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