Keeping bees on Long Island since 1949.

Next Club Meeting on Sunday, September 23, 2:00: Honey Judging and Honey Tasting Contests

Long Island Beekeepers Annual
Honey, Wax, and Mead Judging Contest
Honey Cookery and Gadget Contest

Bring your best Extracted Honey, Comb Honey, Creamed Honey, Beeswax, Mead, Baked Goods, Honey Spreads, Arts and Crafts, Photographs, and Gadgets to this year's contest and you might win a ribbon!
Contest rules can be found here.
All entrants must be paid-up members in good standing as of October of the current calendar year. Section 6 of the Bylaws states that “only members in good standing and members of their immediate families who are present can enter contests if a member is absent, a member of his family may represent him in case of extenuating circumstances can enter items for him.”


Honey Tasting Contest
All club member are invited to bring an unlabeled sample of their bees finest to the meeting.
Remember, everyone can enter as long as they are a club member and you have honey to share in an unmarked jar.


Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.
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Sunday, September 23: Beekeeping 101

Interested in beekeeping, but not sure of what's involved? Attend our free beekeeping for new-bees class: Beekeeping 101.
Before our regular monthly meeting, from 1:00 to 1:45, you can learn some of the basics of beekeeping and find out if it's right for you.

Behind the Barn: If the weather permits, and you want to watch a beekeeper open the hives behind the barn, then you will need to wear a proper veil and clothing.

Our meetings are held at
Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
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President's Message: Steve Chen, LIBC President

Dear Friends and Club Members,

This month’s meeting will be on Sunday, Sept. 23rd. We’ll have our annual Honey Judging and will be watching a Bee Movie as well. How exciting is that? As always, please bring your tough questions to our many experienced and enthusiastic “Meeting Mentors”!

The “Bee 101” talk before the meeting will be presented by Grace, our Education Director and the newest Master Beekeeper. The topic will be “Winter Bees vs. Summer Bees”. You don’t want to miss it!

Lastly, as you know, our October 14, 2018 Honey Conference is just around the corner! So, please sign-up for the conference if you have not yet done so, thanks! You can register by simply click here.

From the Editor's Desk: September 2018

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Honey harvesting is almost done and as usual the unexpected has happened. The wonderful hive that overwintered and was going beautifully into the early summer had three honey supers and was the first to be opened with the fantastic help from Jim and Jenn Voneiff and their daughter Lizzie. Much to our dismay there was no honey, just wax moths! All the way down, nothing, the queen had obviously failed some where between July and late August and no brood and therefore not enough bees to fight off the creepy wax moths. What a devastating way to start the harvest.
Fortunatly the remaining two hives were lovely and one hive had done an interesting complication by making a double layer of comb separating from the frame. This delighted me because I was able to remove it using brand new disposable utensils and put it into a brand new container to deliver it to several friends who are kosher since it was untouched by my equipment, just in time for the Jewish New Year.
REMEMBER THIS IS THE HONEY JUDGING MEETING!  YOU MUST BE A MEMBER IN GOOD STANDING TO PARTICIPATE! Bring your honey in the proper size jar, filled to the correct line, no labels! Come as early as possible and form a quiet line with your entries according to last month’s categories.
We welcome more new members to our ever growing club: Sean McArdle, Danielle Miscioscia, Diane Miller, Suzanne Figurski, Mark Altchiler, and Pamela Kelly
 
DUES FOR 2018 ARE WAY OVERDUE!

   Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST!  Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira Alexander at ramoi@aol.com and put LIBC classified ads in the subject line.

From the Editor's Desk: August 2018

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There are hot bees this month. They are busy as ever, but hanging out to keep cool, the front of the hives are covered with bees. I had to check my less productive hive last week, thanks to help from Lorraine to do the lifting. Since it was so hot I chose to go birthday suit under my bee suit. Won’t do that again after getting a few stings right through the fabric! Fortunately I only get little red dots, maybe I won’t suffer from arthritis in that particular part of my anatomy, LOL!
Our Second Annual Picnic was a wonderful success, weather holding off to allow 135 members to enjoy a great afternoon of meeting, greeting and getting to know each other.
And we had some more new members sign up this month! Welcome to: Jordan Pincus, Anthony Barbera, Amanda Lerch, Laura Eppig, and Barbara Walsh,
DUES FOR 2018 ARE WAY OVERDUE!
Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST! Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira Alexander at ramoi@aol.com and put LIBC classified ads in the subject line.

President's Message: Steve Chen, LIBC President

Greetings from sunny (and hot) Hampton, Virginia - a few hundred miles south of Long Island - at the 2018 EAS (Eastern Apicultural Society) Conference.
Over the past few days Moira, Rich, Wally, Grace, Andrew, Debbie, and I enjoyed wonderful presentations on different aspects of beekeeping by many famous, super-experienced beekeepers and academics. Lorraine was here as a vendor bringing our number to eight members present, including three who took part in the EAS Master Beekeeper certification program, our club was very well-represented indeed. I'm happy to report that all three have passed the multi-part exam! Additionally, I understand that Joan, Marianne, Chris, and Neil have just obtained Cornell University’s Master Beekeeper certifications as well. Congratulations to all. It appears that our club has gained seven new Master Beekeepers since July! More resources for our newer members, that's great!
 
Attending club and regional conferences really helps us improve our beekeeping skills and connections. I want to encourage you to take advantage of future EAS conferences (2019 will be in South Carolina) as well as ones organized by other clubs or groups, not to mention our very own mini-conference on October 14, 2018. 
 
We'll have more to report on this week-long learning trip to EAS at our club meeting on Sunday, August 26.  At this upcoming club meeting, as usual, from 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm Grace will speak about “Readying Your Hives for Winter (in August)” at the Barn, and Donal will lead the open-hive session at the hives in the field. Remember to bring your veil if you plan to be near the hives with Donal, thanks. Our regular meeting will start at 2 pm. The keynote speaker this month will be Paul Cappy, our NY State Bee Inspector. Please come early, help us setup the chairs, and mingle with other beekeepers.
See you at the meeting!

Steve

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Next Club Meeting on Sunday, August 26, 2:00

NYS Apiary Head Paul Cappy will be discussing American Foulbrood and NYS apiary registration.


Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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Honey Bee Breeding and Genetics Survey

Cornell’s Dyce Lab for Honey Bee Studies is starting a project on honey bee genetics and breeding, and we are looking for beekeepers’ input. 
 

The survey measures New York State beekeepers’ interest and experience buying or breeding bees with particular genetic traits. In the future, we will use the results to evaluate different stocks of honey bees. Completing the survey should take 10-20 minutes. 
 

Honey bee breeding and genetics survey

Thanks for your support,
Scott McArt, assistant professor of pollinator health (Entomology)
Emma Mullen, honey bee extension associate (Cooperative Extension / Entomology)
Ellie Andrews, PhD candidate (Development Sociology)

Sunday, September 23: Honey Judging and Honey Tasting Contests

Long Island Beekeepers Annual
Honey, Wax, and Mead Judging Contest
Honey Cookery and Gadget Contest

Bring your best Extracted Honey, Comb Honey, Creamed Honey, Beeswax, Mead, Baked Goods, Honey Spreads, Arts and Crafts, Photographs, and Gadgets to this year's contest and you might win a ribbon!
Contest rules can be found here.
All entrants must be paid-up members in good standing as of October of the current calendar year. Section 6 of the Bylaws states that “only members in good standing and members of their immediate families who are present can enter contests if a member is absent, a member of his family may represent him in case of extenuating circumstances can enter items for him.”


Honey Tasting Contest
All club member are invited to bring an unlabeled sample of their bees finest to the meeting.
Remember, everyone can enter as long as they are a club member and you have honey to share in an unmarked jar.


Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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Long Island Beekeepers Club Extractor Lending Program

Learn more about the Club's new Long Island Beekeepers Club Extractor Lending Program by visiting the Member Services page.

LIBC HoneyBee Conference - October 14, 2018

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6th Annual Long Island Honey Bee Conference
Hosted by the Long Island Beekeepers Club
Sunday, October 14, 2018
 
Sisters of St Joseph Conference Center
1725 Brentwood Road
Brentwood NY

Registration and Breakfast starts at 9:00 am
 
Ross Conrad from 10:00 to 11:30
Lunch starts at noon
Samuel Ramsey from 1:00 to 2:30

LIBC Members: $30
Non-Members: $40


Includes Continental Breakfast and Box Lunch

Click here to buy tickets

Autumn 2018 Beekeeping Classes

Information on beekeeping classes can be found here on our website.

From the Editor's Desk: July 2018

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Bees are busiest bees ever. I was sitting on my deck and they are just going back and forth all day long. John came over and we checked each hive and didn’t see the queens but there was plenty of brood, nice patterns, eggs and larvae. Found small amount of drone brood in each hive and a few mites  so treated them.  I hope to check in with them on Tuesday to see if more supers are needed.
The last meeting was full again and here are --more new members to welcome: Gregory Stewart, Robert Blacharski, Craig Banger, Terri Newman, Mark and Gina Melton, Gordon Cinco, Christopher Thomas, Jay Wayne, Jesse Stoff,
DUES FOR 2018 ARE WAY OVERDUE!

   Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST!  Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira Alexander at ramoi@aol.com and put LIBC classified ads in the subject line.

Club Picnic on Sunday, July 22, 1:00

Club Picnic


We will not have any type of meeting or 101 classes on July 22nd. This is your time to BEE SOCIAL.
The picnic will begin at 1pm, RAIN OR SHINE
It will be held inside the barn where it is air-conditioned. Your spouses and families are invited to attend.

Looking for a setup crew to help get tables and chairs setup at 12:30.

You are asked to bring a salad or dessert to contribute to the party.
  • Last names beginning with A - L: please bring a salad...with a serving spoon
  • Last names beginning with M - Z: please bring a dessert.

You will take your salad or dessert HOME with you at the end of the party or when you leave.

The club will provide soda and water to drink at the event.
If you want another type of beverage please BYOB.

The club has hired someone to provide and cook the hamburgers and hotdogs.

We need an accurate number of people attending so that we have enough burgers and dogs for everyone, so you DID NOT SIGN UP and would like to attend please email at Ramoi@aol.com and tell me the number of people attending.

JIVE with the HIVE! We'd love to hear some live music at this event. We invite anyone that plays an instrument to bring it along and share your musical talent with us!


Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.

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EAS 2018 Annual Conference


EAS_logo_small
EAS 2018 Where it all began



August 13 - 17, 2018
Short Course: August 13-15
Conference: August 15-17


REGISTER NOW!


Join the Eastern Apicultural Society for the annual Short Course and Conference, a week-long educational experience featuring internationally known research scientists, extension apiculturists, apiary inspectors and beekeeping experts at every level.
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The nearly 70 speakers and their bios can be viewed on the EAS 2018 web page along with the full Short Course and Conference Schedules, plus a description of special events!
Pack your veil for hands-on experience with expert instructors; the onsite apiary will feature Top Bar and Warre hives in addition to Langstroth hives.
Don't forget to bring your
Honey Show entries. If you don't want to compete, you can participate in the Honey Exchange by bringing 3 of your products to exchange. And please consider bringing a donation to the annual Auction. The generous donations from attendees like you are what makes the auction such a great fundraiser and allows EAS to support the researchers who share so much of their knowledge at the conference.
Thanks to our SPONSORS! Vendor Slots are still open and available for the best EAS vendor hall space in recent memory! Sponsors & Vendors Register here
NEED A HOTEL? Please book any EAS hotel accommodations through our EAS links on the website New this year, we’ve partnered with a roommate and carpool service- search for EAS 2018 at https://conferenceshare.co/

856-234-1799| registrar@easternapiculture.org  | www.easternapiculture.org/

How can you get there?


40% of the US population is within one day's drive (10 hours or less) of Hampton, Virginia.
20 Minutes from two International Airports:

ORF)
Norfolk (
  • PHF)
    Newport News/Williamsburg (
  • 15 Minutes from Amtrak Train Station
    5 Minutes from Interstate-64

    Hampton Roads Convention Center:

    1610 Coliseum Drive, Hampton|VA

    July Thoughts on Hive Management

    From the hives of Moira and Grace:

    Winter management starts now!  The Long Island nectar flow is slowing down and soon will end.  Some nectar will still be coming in, but, the opportunity to make and store honey is almost over.
    Beekeepers need to evaluate their hive, queen health and performance to determine actions to be taken to prepare for fall and winter.
    -          This means you have to do a thorough inspection of the colony, all the way down through the bottom box to the bottom board.
    -          Each and every time you go into the hive, look for the following:
    o   Brood pattern
    o   Health of the brood
    o   All stages of brood (capped, larvae, and eggs) to show presence of the queen
    o   Population as compared to space
    o   Resources (Pollen, Honey, open Nectar)
    Beekeepers need to use the information they find to correct problems within the colony.  Absence of egg and small larvae could mean queen loss.  Backfilling of nectar into the brood box now (as opposed to during a heavy nectar flow) can be another indicator of queenlessness.  Options include moving egg and larvae from another colony to provide an opportunity for making a new queen.  It also indicates if they need a queen or if there is a virgin queen present (then they will just cap the brood).  Another option is to purchase a mated queen from a queen breeder.  For this situation, check the LIBC classified to see if a queen is readily available locally, or, we recommend the following queen producers:  Oliveras Honey Bees, Old Sol Bees, or Strachan Apiaries.  The presence of brood will delay the development of “laying workers”, so adding brood from another hive will buy you time to fix the queenless issue.
     
    This is a great time to take and extract excess honey while there is still nectar to forage because the bees are not protecting it as aggressively.  You need to leave minimum of 60 lbs of honey (meaning capped) in the hive.  Realize that the bees need food for daily sustenance through the fall as we have insignificant fall nectar flow.  Real honey is the best food for bee survival.  Sugar syrup is a back up food, and does not contain all the micro-nutrients of honey.  Realize that you must continually check for stores and start feeding when you determine the bees have started eating their stored honey.  
     
    Beekeepers should evaluate the strength of all colonies within an apiary and consider equalizing to minimize robbing potential.  Moving capped brood from stronger colonies to smaller colonies now will give your weaker colonies a chance to develop a larger population for winter cluster.  Robbing often becomes a problem in the summer and fall on Long Island due to the lack for forage.  Smaller colonies are unable to guard and protect their resources, especially with large entrances.  So, reducing entrance sizes or adding a robbing screen will assist in this.  Bee Smart sells a robbing screen that fits 8—10 frame boxes and you can get them directly from him locally (see LIBC classified).
     
    Water is critical for hives during the summer heat as they use it to cool the hive to maintain optimum temperature for the brood.  Many hives will “beard” to give the colony a better chance to cool the brood/hive by moving a large portion of the bees outside on the hive front.  Ventilation helps the bees to cool the hive by creating a flow of air.  Screened bottom boards and ventilated (screened) inner covers help them do this.
     
    If you haven’t already done so, now is the perfect time to test for mite load.  We have covered this before, but, you can watch the demonstration on mite testing at:  https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=video+on+mite+testing&&view=detail&mid=DBF2DF0502C967E03054DBF2DF0502C967E03054&&FORM=VDRVRV
    This is the time of year to treat for mites to stay ahead of the mite infestation by treating.  Be aware of temperature and specifics of the mite treatment you choose to use.  Read and follow the directions of the specific treatment.  Treatments can be extremely hard on your bees and queen, therefore, after treating make sure you still have a laying queen.

    Next Club Meeting on Sunday, June 24, 2:00

    Guest Speakers: Joan Mahoney presents the "Mite Test Demonstration", Moira Alexander's presentation on "Honey and Wax Preparation for Honey Competition", and the "Bee Swap"




    Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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    From the Editor's Desk: June 2018

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    Our May meeting was another wonderfully successful meeting. Just shy of 100 names signed in, I think a few people slipped in without taking the time to sign in, but a full house was evident. We had four new members sign up at the meeting and I have had even more on Pay Pal the past few weeks. Please make sure you stop by the desk to pick up your new membership cards and give me your phone numbers to update our database and say hello. We welcome these new members Wayne Smsith II, the Jenny B Project, Carl Zanetti, Robert Sterner, Matthew Doherty, Kathleen Nugent, John Moss, June Mosca, Olivia Campbell, Andrew Thayer, Laurie Appel, Amanda Steadman and Paul Carovinci,
     
    DUES FOR 2018 ARE DUE!

       Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.

    Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST!  Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira Alexander at ramoi@aol.com and put LIBC classified ads in the subject line.


    President's Message: Steve Chen, LIBC President

    It’s May, the temperature is warming and our industrious busy bees are flying around from flower to flower making sweet honey! What can be better than this? Well, our action-packed monthly bee club meeting, of course.

    Keeping our bees healthy is the key to sustainable beekeeping. Therefore, for the second year in a row, our club is purchasing mite treatments in bulk to make them available in small quantities for our members at-cost. Members who placed orders in April with Education Director Grace Mehl can pick them up at our next meeting, on Sunday May 27. Grace will also be discussing adding supers, taking honey and extracting. VP Donal Peterson will conduct monthly open-hive session at the back of the Barn – weather permitting. Bring your veils.

    Important announcement: our club is one of the three clubs in New York State participating in a year-long USDA program called Honey Bee Health First Responder Project. The grant will enable our club to sponsor at least 2 experienced club members for training on identifying the pests and infectious diseases that threaten our honeybees. Our “first responders” will conduct outreach and education sessions within and outside our club as well as hands-on inspection and assessment of members’ colonies to find and eliminate honey bee diseases before they become a serious threat. This is very exciting! We need interested members both to participate in the project as responders and to sign-up apiaries for inspection and assessment.

    Back to the exciting meeting planned for this Sunday. Our keynote speaker is EAS Master Beekeeper Ken Williams. Ken is a beekeeper of 30 years; he raises 1500-2000 queens per year, teaches queen rearing courses, produces nucs, honey, and provides pollination services. He will be discussing treatment v. non-treatment, making splits, queen production, and troubleshooting issues great and small. You don’t want to miss his presentation. Bring any and all of your tough beekeeping questions!

    Lastly, please save these dates: July 22, 2018 for our annual club picnic, and Oct. 14, 2018 for our mini-conference (keynotes: Samuel Ramsey & Ross Conrad).

    See you at the meeting!

    Steve

    From the Editor's Desk: May 2018

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    My nucs finally arrived and I was able to hive them successfully. I hope Wednesday or Thursday will be pleasant so I can go and check them and see if I can find the queens and make sure she is laying. John Holden came to check on his hive and installed a Tom Seeley design swarm box on the other side of my yard. I held my breath as he climbed the ladder, but it went without a hitch. Now keeping an eye on it to see if any neighboring swarms want to take up residence.

    Another successful meeting with more new members joining our ranks. Welcome to DawnMarie Schmitz, Irenusz Szczesny, John Lovett, Kimbe Meares, John Sperduto, Tammy Paladino, Janet Metcalf, Kurt Rose, Maureen Kumar, Meredith Page, Doreen Oliveri, and Maggie Gray

    Next Club Meeting on Sunday, May 27, 2:00

    Guest Speaker: Kent Williams

    Kent Williams has been a beekeeper for 30 years, and provides nucs, honey, and pollination services on a small scale, and also raises about 1500-2000 queens per year. He is an EAS certified master beekeeper, a past president of EAS and the Kentucky State Beekeepers, and teaches a queen rearing course throughout beekeeping season.


    Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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    LIBC in the News

    "North Shore beekeepers, assemblymen work together to save bee colonies"
    Read the entire article at: http://tbrnewsmedia.com/north-shore-beekeepers-assemblymen-work-together-save-bee-colonies/

    Beekeeping 101 Class Schedule

    Interested in beekeeping, but not sure of what's involved? Attend our free beekeeping for new-bees class: Beekeeping 101.
    Before our regular monthly meeting, from 1:00 to 1:45, you can learn some of the basics of beekeeping and find out if it's right for you.

    Below is a list of our planned topics for the class. Also, every class will have "Plants Blooming for Bees this Month" and a recommended reading list.

    May: Methods of Supering & Taking Honey and Extracting
    June: Queen Evaluation
    August: Winter Preparations (Resources, Queens, Mites)
    September: The Last Treatment and Winter Bees versus Summer Bees
    October: No class
    November: To Wrap or Not to Wrap, and Storing Equipment
    December: Clustering and Temperature Management
    January 2019: Winter Feeding and Clustering
    February: 2019 Spring Management
    March 2019: Inspections or What to Plant for Bees

    Next Club Meeting on Sunday, April 22, 2:00

    Guest Speaker: EAS Master Beekeeper Bill Hesbach, owner of Wing Dance Apiary in Connecticut

    He will be discussing the "The Dynamics of Honey Bee Flight and Sexual Reproduction."
    In part one, we will discuss how for decades honey bees managed to elude a scientific explanation of their mastery of flight until ultra high-speed videography and an understanding of air turbulence provided the first fascinating clues.
    The second part will cover the biology of what happens after a queen finishes her mating flights both before and after egg laying starts. We will trace the migration of sperm through the queen's body and her fascinating ability to fertilize eggs for the production of workers and hold back on the fertilization of drones.

    Bill Hesbach is an EAS certified Master Beekeeper and a graduate of the University of Montana’s Master Beekeeping program. He is an active educator in local area bee clubs and the president of the Connecticut Queen Breeders Cooperative. In addition to running Wing Dance Apiary where he produces artisanal honey, Bill is an author and his writings on different aspects of beekeeping can be found in Bee Culture, BEEKeeping and Bee Craft magazines.

    Bill is an advocate of sustainable beekeeping and serves on the board of the Connecticut Back Yard Beekeepers Association and assists the Connecticut Beekeepers Association in their statewide efforts to educate beekeepers. Among his many interests in beekeeping, bee biology and two-queen systems are among his favorites. As a bee ambassador, Bill conducts educational seminars in local schools, area universities, and is a regular guest speaker at other regional bee clubs.

    Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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    From the Editor's Desk: April 2018

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    I had six inches of snow on Easter and that afternoon my bees were flying. Tuesday it was warm enough to pop the hive open and add some more fondant. One lady was so happy she walked on my bee suit sleeve and left a trail a bee poop dots! I am going to lift them off with scotch tape and mail them to my eight year old grandson who is fascinated with bee biology so he can look at the poop under the microscope. Hope he finds something interesting. Set up my other hives waiting for my nucs to arrive, hopefully after the coming snow storm on Saturday.

    We had one hundred three people sign the clip board at our last meeting and I counted at least fifteen more people who forgot to sign in! We are tipping the scales for all time records for attendance! Two more members renewed this week as well as new members joining via Paypal all the time.

    Welcome the new members Janet Metcalf, Katie Stockhammer, Theresa Labrozzi, Karen Ulrich

    DUES FOR 2018 ARE DUE!

    Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.

    Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST! Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira Alexander at ramoi@aol.com and put LIBC classified ads in the subject line.

    Next Club Meeting on Sunday, March 25, 2:00

    Guest Speaker: Michele Colopy on Pesticides Wintering in Your Hives

    The health of honey bees is impacted by the cumulative effects of pests, pathogens, pesticides, and poor forage. Learn the pesticide exposure routes for bees, the synergistic effects created, and how we can work to reduce pesticide exposures, and ensure healthier honey bees.

    Michele Colopy has been the Program Director of the Pollinator Stewardship Council since March 2013. Her father was a beekeeper in southeast Ohio. She keeps honey bees in the city, and has replaced her crabgrass front yard with pesticide-free pollinator flowers for her honey bees and native pollinators.
    The Pollinator Stewardship Council is a nonprofit organization of beekeepers whose mission is to defend managed and native pollinators, vital to a sustainable and affordable food supply, from the adverse impact of pesticides.

    Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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    From the Editor's Desk: March 2018

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    My surviving hive is still flying today after two nor’easters. We have another due tomorrow and I am just praying that these girls will get huddled up close again. I didn’t see them on the crocus or snow drops and I have yet to ever see them on the witch hazel. Hopefully they are over at Camp Edey, the Girl Scout Camp directly west and the Sans Souci Lakes where the skunk cabbage is native. They still have fondant, waiting for the snow to melt so they can find the dandelions!

    Please welcome these new members, Amy Smith, Michael Rocco, Michele Garr, Richard Brown, Trish Devenish, Michelle Peluso, Patricia Werner, Jasmine Wolber, Brett Klug,Neil Rodgers and Kathy Scalzo.

    DUES FOR 2018 ARE DUE!

    Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.

    Any member who has not paid their dues by March 31, 2018 will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST! Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Conni to update your classified ads connistill@aol.com

    Next Club Meeting on Sunday, February 25, 2:00

    Guest Speaker: Stewart Jacobson on Varroa Resistant Queens Are the Foundation of Sustainable Beekeeping

    The vast majority of honey bee scientists agree that the varroa-mite complex is the number one reason for colony losses. This is not to minimize the roles of habitat destruction. Varroa Resistant queens are of critical importance to increasing the survival of honey bees. We need many more queen producers to focus on raising them. Varroa resistant breeder queens are readily available and small scale producers in this region can raise daughters that will be both resistant to adapted to the Long Island environment.

    Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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    From the Editor's Desk: February 2018

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    What a crazy month! Bees flying last week, bee poop all over windshield, fed with five slices of fondant and they seemed very happy and busy. Today three inches of snow flurries! Can’t wait to see what the Super Blue Moon will bring and the Ground Hog will bring this week.

    This month’s meeting had to be the record breaker, There were 112 sign ins and I know some of you didn’t sign in! Fifty members renewed their memberships and 24 families joined the club We welcome them and the other new members who joined via email: Nancy Miller, Gabriele Handley, Brian Georgens, Joseph Magnoli, Victoria Cautela, John Mauceri, Brian White, Scott Muller, TJ Adams, Mark Ciechanowicz, Richard Fredericks, Deborah Trainor, Phylis Byrne, Andrea Bertolino, Sandy & Andy Maliszewski, James Aiello, Diane & Adam Gorecki, Robert Anderson, Brian Beatty, Edith St.John, Sharon & Don Hoey, Barbara & Ron Wallace, Jennifer Vorbach, Deb Kimmelman, Brian Heenan, Alma Murphy, Scott furrer, Thomas Whelan, John Condzella, Leonard Carolan, Tamara Read, Kathleen Kelly, James C. Schultz, Erin Cathey, Grete Eide and Dan Battaglia.These new members come from all over the island from Far Rockaway to Cutchogue, from Northport and Oyster Bay to Oakdale and Southhampton and everywhere in between.

    I’m sorry we ran out of membership cards, but they will be ready at the February meeting in a box in alphabetical order where you sign in, so pick yours up when you come in. And those who have no card ready……

    DUES FOR 2018 ARE DUE!

    Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, go to the club website Longislandbeekeepers.org and use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.

    Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters, AND WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THE HONEY JUDGING CONTEST! Also please update your copy for your ads. Send your information to Moira to update your classified ads RAMOI@aol.com, LIBC