Keeping bees on Long Island since 1949.

Club Meeting August 28: Guest Speaker Virginia Webb

Virginia Webb of Mtn Honey will be our guest speaker on Sunday, August 28.
She will be explaining how to prepare your submissions for a honey show.
Virginia and Carl Webb are full-time commercial beekeepers and queen producers. Virginia and Carl have received more than 100 First Place Awards including Best of Show Awards for honey and beeswax entries. And, for each of the last 10 years, they have won First Place at the National Honey Show sponsored by the American Beekeeping Federation. They have also been awarded four gold medals at the World Honey Show for Best Honey in the World.

Our meeting will be at the Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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From the Editor's Desk: August 2016

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Everyone knows it is getting to be harvest time. Where ever I go I am asked “Do you have honey yet”. I already have a list of potential customers and am just hoping that the filled supers that I saw at last examination will be as full next week when I begin my extraction process. I ordered some fancy jars for gift giving and tomorrow I start to get the honey area of the garage prepared.
I am really looking forward to this month’s meeting and seeing Virginia Webb again. I met her at Apimondia Dublin in 2005 and was so impressed with her wonderful exhibit of honey and honey products. She will have a lot to teach us about preparing for a honey show!
There was no meeting last month, but we still had some new members sign up. Welcome Matthew Daley, Brendan Upton, Lesley Sondey, and Debra Cardone
 

   Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.
 
Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.
 

Letter to the Editor:

Dear Editor: I wanted to reach out to show my appreciation to the Long Island Beekeeper’s Club for allowing me to come speak on the topic of the “importance of Liability Insurance” last December. Since that meeting I have received calls from members both with follow up questions and with requests for Liability Insurance!. The topics presented during the meeting were both educational and fun as it showed me “the their side of the business”. Far too often I get stuck behind my desk and don’t get to experience the real life stories of what I am insuring. So for that I am grateful!
I also wanted to share with the club an offer that I make to all my current clients. The opportunity for a free cup of coffee! If anyone has questions concerning any aspect of insurance (both including bees or otherwise), AI invite you to bring your questions to me and we can answer the over a cup of coffee! I am available to meet with members of the club either at my office or at their homes, whichever is easiest, and the best part is, the coffee is on me!
Thanks again for allowing me to be a small part of such a great organization and I look forward to attending future meetings as a member.
All the best,
Matthew Daley
Farm Family Insurance Agent

Sunday, August 28: Beekeeping 101

Interested in beekeeping, but not sure of what's involved? Attend our free beekeeping for new-bees class: Beekeeping 101.
Before our regular monthly meeting, from 1:00 to 1:45 you learn some of the basics of beekeeping and find out if it's right for you.
Our meetings are held at
Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
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From the Editor's Desk: July 2016

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This heat is making it hard for beekeepers to work the hives. Fortunately Thursday was a cooler day so I was able to go into the hives with my friend Meredith and see how things were progressing. WE could not lift the honey filled supers to check the brood chambers, but there is lots of honey and I added another super to each hive. This will be the best harvest that I have had in a long time.
I am really looking forward to the August meeting and seeing our speaker Virginia Webb. I met her at Apimondia in Dublin, 2005 and was completely amazed with her exhibit. We will be in for an interesting meeting and hope to learn alot on preparing for honey judging.
We welcome new members to the club, Claudia Vogel, Christopher Peterson, Brian Heenan, Susan Kristensen, Craig Incandela, Robert Martinez, Jennifer Brown, and Keith Kebe.

Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use  PAYPAL,  or pay directly at the next meeting.
 
Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

NYS Issues Pollinator Protection Plan

The NYS Departments of Environmental Conservation and Agriculture and Markets released the long awaited NYS Pollinator Protection Plan which includes the current state of both native and managed pollinators in our state, but also suggested management practices for the health of our bees.

"Wild pollinators and managed bees, typically honeybees and bumblebees kept by beekeepers, are critically important to the health of New York’s environment, as well as the strength of the state’s agricultural economy. New York has more than seven million acres in agricultural production, and many of the state’s leading crops, such as apples, cabbage, berries, pumpkins and several other fruits, rely heavily on insect pollination. New York State is also home to more than 450 wild pollinator species, a native population that is important not only to the pollination of commercial crops, but also to biodiversity in our environment…"

Download and read the entire plan.
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Club Meeting June 26: Guest Speaker Dr. Jamie Ellis

Dr. Jamie Ellis will be our guest speaker on Sunday, June 26.
He will be discussing The Beehive as a Superorganism and the Sustainability of Keeping Bees.

Dr. Ellis joined the Entomology and Nematology department at the University of Florida in August, 2006. His broad research interests include pollination ecology of honey bees and native bees, varroa mite control, honey bee pathology/parasitology, honey bee nutrition, honey bee chemical ecology, sublethal effects of chemicals on bees, and general honey bee behavior/ecology. Dr. Ellis was promoted to an Associate Professor of Entomology in 2012.

Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.
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4th Annual Greater New York Bee Conference - Hosted by the LIBC

4th Annual Greater New York Bee Conference
Hosted by the Long Island Bee Club
Sunday, October 9, 2016
 
Farmingdale State College
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale NY 11753
Roosevelt Hall Student Union

Registration and Sign In 8:30
  9:00 to 3:45

Price $65
Raffles and Door Prizes
Includes Continental Breakfast, Coffee Break, Lunch






Quantity of Tickets




 
Speakers
Richard Fell PhD
Honey Bee Winter Biology and Colony Preparations
Bee Health, Colony Decline and Pesticides
 
Kirsten and Michael Traynor
Honey For Your Health
Over the Atlantic: European Intensive Hive Management

Peter L. Borst
History of Beekeeping in New York State
History of Bee Breeding
 
Bee Supply Companies Attending
Bee Smart
Betterbee
Mann Lake
Dadant
Brushy Mountain
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From the Editor's Desk: June 2016

The new bees and swarm hive are so busy. I added supers and since I bought some new equipment I had to add my traditional screen door handles for ease in lifting. They were all very mild and happy to be examined, lots of brood, pollen and honey going in. I think it is going to be a productive year.
My church held a Spring Fair and I had a table to sell my wares of lotion bars and lip balm and some new soaps. I didn’t sell as much as I had hoped, but did a lot of education to the people who stopped by. More and more people are interested in beekeeping, as evidenced by our recent meetings. There were 100 people at our last meeting and new members joined. Welcome to these new beekeepers: James Wipper, David Faverio,Domenico Grella, George Berotti, David Guzzetta, Heather Littlefield, Abby Link, Mica Marder, Frederick Foelsch, Davis Crowley, Henry Piechucki.
 
This picture was sent to me by my friend Jan North of Blue Point.Thanks Jan for such an interesting piece of history of beekeeping.
beebole
This photo was taken of bee boles in an old drystone wall  made  hundreds of years ago to fence in an orchard on a small farm near Burford,  Oxfordshire, England.. This side of the wall faces east.  Farmers made straw skeps and placed them in the niches. That helped to  keep out wind and rain.  The wall is close to the farmhouse. Honey and beeswax were prized  commodities.  Such walls are now registered landmarks.


Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

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Suffolk County Vector Control (SCVC) and Honey Bees

Suffolk County Vector Control (SCVC) undertook an Environmental Impact Review (EIS) of our program in 2005 which included looking at steps to avoid impacts to bees.  Vector Control takes non-target impacts seriously and through research and review of the scientific literature we have policies in place that greatly reduce potential impacts to native bees and honeybees.
 
SCVC uses an Integrated mosquito control program, where we start with a study the lifecycles of the target organism.  Here in Suffolk County we have 50 species of mosquitoes with a wide variety of ecological niches and each species can vary in its importance and our need for control. 
 
One non-pesticide mosquito control method we are employing is modification to the habitat that can decrease mosquito numbers without adverse impacts to the environment.  SCVC has worked with the USFWS and other governmental agencies and environmental groups in looking at such alternatives to pesticides through wetlands restoration and enhancement techniques (fish access) that also target mosquito breeding sites.  A pilot project at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge showed that using Integrated Marsh Management techniques we were able to practically eliminate the need for pesticides in the project area compared to the control sections.  Control of saltmarsh mosquitoes is important as most saltmarsh species emerge by the millions and can travel several miles and impact adjoining communities that then demand mosquito control spraying.  SCVC is actively undertaking several grant funded projects to continue this wetland restoration program into other coastal wetlands throughout Suffolk.
 
If habitat modifications or access by predators (fish being the only true control organisms that can impact mosquito numbers) cannot control mosquito production, our next step is the use of larval control products.  I should mention here bats, birds and dragonflies barely put a dent in the mosquito population, as their main prey is larger insects such as beetles, moths and dragonflies (which are cannibalistic).  The larvicides we use are pesticide materials considered biorational products by the EPA and are low risk products to non-targets and humans.  They include Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis)  and BSph (Bacillus sphaericus), both bacterial products with toxins specific to mosquitoes, some blackflies and midges.  We use the mosquito growth regulator methoprene if the bacterial products would not be effective on the mosquito due to species or larval stage.  All three materials have been extensively studied and have not been shown to cause impacts to bees, and are EPA and NYS DEC approved for mosquito control in NY.
 
If larval control fails, usually due to weather conditions or if mosquito-borne virus is found, adult mosquito control may be undertaken.  SCVC utilizes several synthetic pyrethroid products with the active ingredients of resmethrin and sumithrin.  While adult control products are broad spectrum and can impact many insect species, we employ the following techniques to mitigate these risks to bees:
 
1. Materials are only applied when warranted, through trapping results and testing for viruses;
2. Pesticides are applied according to the products label and are registered for use by EPA and NYSDEC;
3. The material is applied at low dose rates to reduce impacts to non-targets (~0.6 FL/Acre);
4. Material is applied using ULV techniques where droplets are under 50 microns and most are under 20 microns – sub-lethal to most larger insects;
5. Applications are timed for evening/night hours when bees are not out foraging;
6. The materials we use degrade rapidly in the environment and do not persist through morning when bees are active once again.
7. ULV droplets do not coat vegetation/flowers, unlike coarse soaking sprays used for other insects.
 
We also encourage beekeepers to register their hive locations with us using this form: http://suffolkcountyny.gov/Portals/0/publicworks/PDF/DNS%20request%20form%2020xx.pdf a copy is also attached.  Beekeeper hive locations  on the list will be avoided when possible while trucks are spraying, and are notified the day before a spray event in case they wish to take any additional precautions to protect their hives.  If aerial application is necessary, beekeepers within the spray zone will also be notified the day before in case they wish to take any precautions.
 
Copies of the pesticide labels we use can be found at: http://suffolkcountyny.gov/Departments/PublicWorks/VectorMosquitoControl/VectorOnlineForms.aspx
 
Tom Iwanejko
Chief Environmental Analyst
Suffolk County DPW, Vector Control
335 Yaphank Ave, Yaphank NY 11980
Phone: 631 852-4267 Fax: 631 852-4140
tom.iwanejko@suffolkcountyny.gov
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New Postings In Our Classifieds Section

Looking for beekeeping equipment? Queens? Bees?
Check our Classifieds.
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FROM THE EDITORS DESK: April 2016

Thank you to Grace for picking up my new bees and hiving them for me and delivering them since I could not lift after my recent surgery. They are very happy in their new apiary. Lorraine came over Tuesday and we added another box and everyone was very calm and busy. Then while Lorraine and I were relaxing after our labors I happened to look at the bushes in the rear of my yard and low and behold this is what I saw!
!libcmay1
Lorraine said “what is that” and I said “Beekeeping 201, capturing your first swarm!
Courageous woman that she is we got a bucket, ladder and a few tools and after an hour or so of shaking and trimming we hived the swarm. Thanks Lorraine, I couldn’t have done it without your help, and you now have added this experience to your beekeeping list!
libcmay2

 

We want to welcome another new group of members to our ever growing list: Charles Calabrese, Ken Koch, Andy & Chris Kepert, Robert Schwartz, Judith Vaughan, Imran Ahmad, Christopher, Vilchek, Matthew Gavieta & Miriam Staana, Susan Reichert, Todd Balch, Carrie Davis Crowley, and Frederick Foelsch

 
Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.

Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

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Club Meeting May 22: Guest Speaker Don Conlon

Don Conlon of Warm Colors Apiary will be our guest speaker on Sunday, May 22.
He will be discussing Russian Bee Breeding Program, and Running an Apiary Without Chemical Treatment.

Note: The Smithtown Historical Society will be holding its Spring Farm Festival from 12:00 to 4:00 on the same day as our meeting. The entrance fee is $5, but if you tell the parking attendant that you're attending the Bee Club meeting they should let you in for free. Because of the festival, parking will be limited, so try to arrive early.

Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.
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FROM THE EDITORS DESK: May 2016

My surgery went well and I am recovering nicely. Thank you for the lovely flowering plant. I can’t wait to put it out for the bees to enjoy the blooms as much as I have. The poor bees have been so confused with this crazy weather, one day they are wearing their winter coats and the next their summer frocks! I hope this weekend will start to keep the temperatures steady and warmer with just the proper amount of rain.
We missed having a meeting last month, so the next few month’s schedules are jammed packed with great speakers and activities. SAVE THE DATE FOR OUR 4th ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON October 9, 2016!
Even though we didn’t have a meeting we still received new memberships by mail. We welcome these new members to the club: Thomas Wilk, Thomas Earl,Christina Mitchell,& James Xixis. .

Thank you so much for those of you who have already paid your dues. If you haven’t already paid, please bring your cash or check to the meeting!
Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PayPal, or pay directly at the next meeting.

Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

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April Meeting Handouts

For those of you who didn't get a copy of the handouts from our guest speaker, Paul Cappy:
honeybee sample handout
Paul Cappy- LIBC Meeting

EAS 2016 Annual Conference

July 27 - 29 in Galloway, NJ
Eastern Apiculture Society’s Annual Conference takes place in mid-summer in one of the eastern member states. In 2016, the conference will be at Richard Stockton University near Atlantic City.
There is also a two-day Short Course on July 25 - 26, preceding the main conference for an additional fee, which provides for different levels of experience.

http://www.easternapiculture.org/conferences/eas-2016.html

EAS offers incredible learning opportunities, and especially when it’s in traveling distance it’s worth attending. Don’t you have a friend or relative at the Jersey Shore?! You could slip in some beach time too.

4th Annual Greater New York Bee Conference

Hosted by the Long Island Bee Club
October 9, 2016
 
Farmingdale State College
2350 Broadhollow Road
Farmingdale NY 11753
Roosevelt Hall Student Union
Registration and Sign In 8:30
  9:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Price $65
(Tickets available soon)

Raffles and Door Prizes
Includes Continental Breakfast, Coffee Break, Lunch
 
Speakers
Richard Fell PhD, Department of Entomology Virginia Tech
Honey Bee Winter Biology and Colony Preparations
Bee Health, Colony Decline and Pesticides
  
Peter L. Borst Former Senior Apiarist at Cornell
Former NY Apiary Inspector
Contributor to ABJ
Presenter at ABF 2015
History of Beekeeping in New York State
History of Bee Breeding
 
Kristen Traynor and Michael Traynor
Authors of Two Million Blossoms and Simple Smart Beekeeping
Kristen Traynor, Editor of Bee World
 Kristen Traynor is currently working with Dr. van Engelsdorp at University of Maryland
Honey For Your Health
Over the Atlantic: European Intensive Hive Management

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Club Meeting April 24: Guest Speaker Paul Cappy

New York State Apiculturist, Paul Cappy, will be our guest speaker on Sunday, April 24.
He will be discussing what is happening in New York and how it effects beekeepers here on Long Island.

Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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Homecoming Farm's Annual Spring Awakening Event

springevent

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: March 2016

Last month’s meeting was a record breaker. STANDING ROOM ONLY with 140 people in attendance. We have had so many people join the club since the beginning of the year and I forgot to list them in the last newsletter. So here is the new members so far for 2016. Please join me in welcoming them., Anthony Arno, Valerie Ashton, Marie Becher, Bruce Bluemel, Chih-Mark Chen, , Karen Donegan, Josephine Elsener, Barbara Felle, Larry Festa, Henry Frost, Ellen Gomez, Alberto Goncalves, Diane Guner, Peter Haarmann,Mark Henken, Annie Heroux, Jay Hoffman, Paula Kluse, Terri Kohler, Gerald Latter, Craig Lawrence, John Lovett, John Machado, Brendan Marshall, Wai-L in Ng, Sarah, Linda Obernauer, Scott Parris, Linda Parsons, James Pfister, Anthony Planakis, Gary Pouliot, Jean Marie Posner, Theresa Potter, John Ryley, Katy Sacher, Marlene Sautkulis, David & Phyllis Stein, Nicola Stone-Chang, Matthew Sullivan, Robert Sullivan, James Tyrrell, Richard & Mark Waldmann, Morgana Washingten,

I lost my two hives in the fall due to mites and wax moth infestation. I am looking forward to my new girls and some new equipment soon. John has his hive at my apiary and they are doing fine. I took a picture of the girls working the crocuses yesterday.
I have had several members ask me to user blind copy when sending the newsletter. I thought I had learned how to do it, tried to do it just now and it still didn’t work. I’ll have to call AOL and get someone to help me. Sorry, you’ll have to wait till next month.


We are looking for a new site for the
2016 LONG ISLAND BEE CONFERENCE...
ANY SUGGESTIONS?
The clock is ticking.... Please contact Moira at ramoi@aol.com

Thank you so much for those of you who have already paid your dues. If you haven’t already paid, please bring your cash or check to the meeting!
Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PayPal, or pay directly at the next meeting.

Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

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SABA 2016 Annual Beekeeping Seminar

Southern Adirondack Beekeeping Association
April 9, 2016, 9 am – 5 pm
Guest speakers: Dr. Dewey Caron, Allen Hayes, Grai St. Clair Rice, and Chris Harp
TECSMART Conference Facility
345 Hermes Road, Malta NY 12020
More Info: http://adirondackbees.org/meetingsevents/annual-seminar/
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Club Meeting 2/28: Guest Speaker Vincent Aloyo

Vincent Aloyo Ph.D is an Apiculture Education and Master Beekeeper who has been keeping bees for over 45 years. He teaches beekeeping at undergraduate and continuing education levels, engages in hive-side mentoring, and talks to community groups, nature centers and schools.
Dr. Aloyo will be discussing "The Hive in Winter and Early Spring Feeding."

Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

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FROM THE EDITORS DESK: February 2016

LIBC Elections
Nominations at February Meeting

LIBC Members - we need you to get involved and volunteer to keep our beekeeping association growing and strong!
We are looking for new officers who can lend some time and energy for our wonderful community. If many people share the work there will be joy in the sharing and people won't get burnt out.
We are also looking for members who wish to volunteer for the Hospitality committee so we have yummy things to nibble on during the meetings.
Position of President is Open!!! Volunteers for nominations are eagerly accepted.


We are looking for a new site for the
2016 LONG ISLAND BEE CONFERENCE...
ANY SUGGESTIONS?
The clock is ticking.... Please contact Moira at ramoi@aol.com

Thank you so much for those of you who have already paid your dues by mail or PayPal. If you haven’t already paid, please bring your cash or check to the meeting!
Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PayPal, or pay directly at the next meeting.

Please remember that dues are due by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

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President's Message: I WANT YOU

Members Only

The LIBC has set up a Yahoo Group to allow members to exchange ideas and information. Group membership is only available to members in good standing.


Click to join the Long Island Beekeepers Club Yahoo Group (Members Only)

The Club also has a Facebook page!

Club Meeting Sunday, 1/24: Cancelled due to weather

Unfortunately, due to the recent snow storm this month's meeting has been cancelled.
Our apologies to our Mr. Flatow, but we will reschedule his presentation for later in the year.

Local beekeeper, and club member, Carl Flatow will be presenting:
“Not Just Honey Bees.... A Photographic Tour of Visitors to our Flowers.”

Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00. Members and non-members are invited to attend.

Welcome to our new website!

We're starting off 2016 with a new look for our website; it's easier to navigate and it works on mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. So now you can take us with you and stay up to date with the latest club news!
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LIBC Meeting Schedule for 2016

We will be enjoying another year of great speakers, opportunities to learn from our own expert beekeepers, and fun social events.
If you would like to speak or if you would like to suggest a speaker for a future meeting, please email president@longislandbeekeepers.org.
We meet the 4th Sunday of each month. Unless otherwise noted, our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown. Meetings start promptly at 2:00
If you use Google Calendar, you can subscribe to the Google's LIBC Meeting Calendar by clicking on this link.

Sunday, January 24, 2016
Sunday, February 28, 2016
No Meeting in March
Sunday, April 24, 2016
Sunday, May 22, 2016
Sunday, June 26, 2016
No meeting in July
Sunday, August 28, 2016
Sunday, September 25, 2016
Sunday, October 23, 2016
Sunday, November 27, 2016
Sunday, December, 2016: Annual Holiday Luncheon
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If You Missed the LIBC Holiday Party, Then You Missed a Good Time

This year the LIBC honored Frank Kiss at our Christmas party for his love, passion and dedication to the hobby of beekeeping. He is a long time member and has kept bees since he was a child with his grandfather back in Hungry. His practical hands-on knowledge of working bees has served him well as a long time beekeeper. Many of our club members turn to Frank for hive and bee advice as new keepers. We thank him for his long time commitment to the craft of keeping bees and encourage him always to keep working his bees and bottling his delicious honey.
unknown

A special dedication was made by club president George Schramm to Ray Lackey for his years of service to LIBC and his teaching and mentoring of the members. We will certainly miss Ray and his lovely wife Ginny and their family as they begin their th new life in Michigan. We hope this plaque will help them remember us.
unknown

A big thank you to board members Joe and Moira for all their hard work on the Holiday dinner. Everything was wonderful! The food and venue were terrific and the raffles and door prizes were lots of fun. The best part was everything ran smoothly. Great job!

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: November 2015



Our Honey Judging Contest was a huge success as always, lots of entries, with many categories. Congratulations to Helen Mecagni for winning Best in Show with her highest points from her Water White Honey, Amber Honey and Light Amber Honey. First Place Winners were Bill O’Hern, Charles DiStefano, John Hardecker, Guissepe Caso, Second Place Guissepe Caso, Charles DiStefano, Roy Baillard, Helen Mecagni, , Third Place Christine & Kathryn Moravick, Lorraine Leacock, Helen Mecagni, Honorable Mention, Joan Mahoney, John Hardecker, Dorothy & Stan Gorecki, Marsha Greenman, John Quinn, Marianne Sangersland, Michael Ryan, Conni Still all for their honey.
Honorable Mentions were given to Marsha Greenman for her Cookies, Peter McCabe for his Gadget. In the Art First Prize went to Joan Mahoney for her Beeswax, Second to Charles DiStefano for his Beeswax. In the Bee Artwork category Barbara Munzer received a First Prize, Catherine Watson a Second Prize, and Risa Gold a Third Prize.
Congratulations to all the winners and a Huge Thank You to Fred Munzer and Rich Blohm, our great judges for their hard work.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: December 2015

Our holiday party was a huge success, thanks so much to Joe Matza and Moira Alexander for their arranging the restaurant and the door prizes. Thanks to Anna and Grace for leading us in our annual rendition of the Twelve Days of Beekeeping much to the enjoyment of the other diners in the restaurant as well. The grab bag gifts had some wonderful bee items, it’s amazing how many gift items are out there for us collectors!
Please remember that your dues are due for 2016. I am having more surgery probably mid January and will not be at that meeting. I would appreciate it if you could please send your dues by mail or by Pay Pal. That will avoid long lines for whoever is taking the dues in my absence. A Very Merry Christmas and Happy and Healthy New Year to you all!

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

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FROM THE EDITORS DESK: October 2015



I hope everyone had a wonderful time at the conference today. I was so sad to have missed it, but just recuperating from major surgery I didn’t have the stamina to attend. Hope to see you at the next meeting.
Our last meeting brought us another new group of beekeepers to welcome: James Smith, Nancy Smith, David Tifford, Andrea Cayea, Ira Barocas, Ty Knox, Christopher G. Hansen-Crowley and Anne A. Hansen-Crowley

Don’t forget that the Honey Judging Contest is this coming meeting. You must be a member in Good Standing to enter the contest. If you have not paid your dues this year, you must have your check or cash in hand before you can submit your honey or entry for the contest!!!!! Please try to come a little earlier to take care of this business so the meeting can get started on time.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: September 2015



It was a hot dry summer, the flowers didn’t give up much nectar so the bees didn’t produce as much honey as last year’s bumper crop. But I still harvested a little over 50 pounds from the one good hive. The requeened hive finally failed and Ray helped me combine it with the thriving hive. John came and helped remove the honey and then we had a little NEWBEE Extraction Party with Lorraine, Jennifer and Jim getting Extracting 101 lessons. It was fun, sticky and I showed them my technique with some of my equipment devised to assist the older beekeeper with handicapping conditions. Then my grandson came to visit during the week and helped bottle and label which makes him very proud to help and gives him something to bring back to school to tell his friends about. I have all my pre-orders set up to deli ver, made sure my regular customers get taken care of first. I purchased pretty hexagonal small jars for gift giving this year. When you don’t have a huge yield you find a way to still give presents that look fancy but are cost effective. All in the packaging! Now to get the lip balms and lotion bars and soaps cranking for the fair so I still have a table full to sell. Need to keep these girls profitable for me. They eat lots of fondant all winter. I hope you all did well.
We welcome two new members to the club this month. Robert Lodi and Jonathan Ramsay.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

The Garden Column

By Lorraine Leacock, Master Gardener
(Courtesy Cornell Cooperative Extension)

As a new-bee this year, I was pleasantly surprised to read Juergen Jaenicke's monthly gardening articles. I had no idea he was a beekeeper, only knowing him through Master Gardener Volunteer (MGV) channels. So, it was with great disappointment to see in the May newsletter that he was considering retirement. I am a 2008 graduate of Cornell's MGV program...20 weekly meetings learning different aspects of gardening, with quite an emphasis on insects! After quizzes, a final exam and 120 hours of volunteer work, we are certified but must continue to contribute 30 hours annually in an abundance of ways...gardening in our communities, teaching, writing, and most importantly, reporting.

My gardening world began with my parents in England...memories of Mum's cottage flowers, my Dad's small greenhouse where he grew tomatoes, his grafted roses, lush lawn maintained with a manual hand-pushed mower, and stepping on a bee with bare feet (probably a bumble). They planted the seed in my interest but sadly not the knowledge.

Having little science background, I struggled with many failures in the sandy Long Island "soil"...no loam...not knowing the importance of the basics. The naive thinking was to dig a hole and throw a plant in it, or to start vegetables from seed and expect results without proper conditions. I now know it all starts with the growing medium, and that plants flourish when they have the right climate, nutrients, ph level, sun exposure, water and pollination!

I'm no expert by any means but strive to learn from those who are and from my mistakes. If I am to be the new gardening writer, I have big shoes to fill and hope to be able to impart something of value. Thanks Juergen for your inspiration, information sharing and service. If it is semi-retirement you seek, your periodic contributions will be looked forward to.

Three Cheers, Lorraine

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: August 2015



Hi beekeepers. We missed you all last month. With no meeting and me on total bedrest and major computer problems I’m sorry I wasn’t able to get out a newsletter for July. Hope this one will find you all working on getting your hives extracting or ready to, as am I. John came over the other day and we found bad news and good news. His new hive is working and building comb and storing honey, but not greatly. My requeened hive is failing badly. Little brood with evidence of chalk brood, first time I have ever had that before. I will have to speak to my next door neighbor about trimming the mulberry tree that might be creating too much shade on my hives. My western hive is amazing! Three supers of capped honey and one that needs capping. Very busy bees, hanging out on their porch and enjoying the slightly cooler day. We did see some hive beetles and put in a new trap and tomorrow I will clean the burr comb from the inner cover to give them less places to hide. We will plan to pull the honey when I get back from visiting my grandkids. Finally! I had to postpone the July trip because of my back problems. Can’t wait to see my family.
We welcome new members Dennis Pantoliano and Kate Soroka.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

LIBC Member, Cliff Struhl, in Edible Long Island

Bee Smart Designs
Syosset’s pioneer of symbiotic beekeeping supplies.
Ventilation, moisture, predators. It’s not all about honey for Syosset beekeeper Cliff Struhl, who understands the threats that make or break the health of his hives.
Frustrated by the limitations of available beekeeping equipment, the hobby sculptor and CEO of Joseph Struhl Company Inc.—a local graphics company specializing in custom polyethylene signs—began prototyping his idea for perfect beekeeping enhancements. Applying the basic engineering and materials used in his signs, Struhl started Bee Smart Designs to make functional, bee-friendly apiary equipment.
Read more at http://www.ediblelongisland.com/2015/05/27/bee-smart-designs/

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: June 2015



Hope your bees are doing well. My re-queened hive is still weak. I gave it another frame of brood from the strong hive last week, hoping to boost it until the new brood hatches. The strong hive has tons of bees. It swarmed into a tree two streets away. I didn’t find out exactly where it was until they took off again, so I couldn’t capture them. I saw lots of empty queen cells but no queen. Found eggs and new larva and new brood. If I had found the queen I could have given a whole super to the weak hive, but I have no idea where she’s hiding. So I have my fingers crossed on the survival of the new girls.
I found an old photo from a meeting while clearing some files and realized that there were probably about 20 or so members at that meeting just a few years ago. We have come a long way since then, growing to over 200 paid members. This month we welcome new member Joseph Cardali, Keith Kebe

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

Sunday, May 24: Tammy Horn

Apiforestation: The Future of Beekeeping?

If you have any of Tammy’s books, bring them with you and she will autograph them for you.
beeconomy-cover300beesinamerica_cover300

Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: May 2015



I have been keeping bees since April 7, 1980 and this year was my first experience in requeening! Both hives survived our brutal winter but one was not doing as well as the other. The brood pattern was spotty and I knew the queen had to be removed. I was fortunate to purchase a new one and thanks to my fellow beekeeper John Holden we opened the hive and found the old queen on the second frame we checked. We scooped her up into a vial with a few friends and then put the new queen into place, loosening the candy plug. After two days I checked and she was still in place. I poked at the candy some more and checked again in two days. Still no movement. Now I was beginning to panic, so I tried to pry more candy away and checked again in two days. She still hadn’t escaped so I took a blade and popped the other plug out and she ran right down into a frame. So now I’ll have to wait a few more days to check for eggs and hope for the best. Meanwhile I threw out my back lifting the three supers that were on top, so my chiropractor is getting to be a regular visitor. UGH!
Last month’s meeting was another huge success with a great speaker and lots of new members. We are happy to welcome Wane R. Dougal Jr., Joshua Kaplan, Chris Gee, Patrick Cannone, Thomas Delio, Jennifer & James VonEiff, and Christian Reina

Do you have an up-to-date Epi-Pen? Thanks to Richard Stark, here’s how to get one for little or no money. On your computer, go to Epipen.com. Click on $0 Co-Pay offer. Fill out the form to see if you are eligible based on your prescription policy. Get a prescription from your doctor and bring the $0 copay card and RX to your pharmacy and you can get your Epi-Pen for up to $0. This offer expires 12/31/15.

Since we are getting new members every month, the membership list changes constantly. I have an up to date list on my computer and send it to George regularly to post on the website. If you would like a copy for your own information, so you can find out who is in your neighborhood, email me and I will email you a copy. If you do not have email, call me or ask me at the meeting and I will bring a copy for you to the next meeting. Just remember, it changes monthly, so I will only do this quarterly to avoid the great amount of paperwork required. Thanks.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

Sunday, April 26: Allen Hayes

Guest Speaker:
Allen Hayes
The Gadget Guy!



Our meetings are held at Smithtown Historical Society Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main Street (Route 25), Smithtown.
The meeting starts promptly at 2:00.

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: April 2015



Are your bees playing hide and seek? My girls keep peeking out and yelling what happened to the sun and warm weather! I’ve been feeding slices of fondant and so far they are happily eating it but I can’t wait for some warm days to be able to actually get into the hive and look around.

Last month’s meeting had a full house again, lots of people came for Beekeeping 101, some stayed for the rest of the meeting, some left. Other members just came for the formal meeting, so it is hard to get a real head count but 75 of you did sign in. We keep seeing new faces and we have some new members to welcome this month: Joan Tifford, Thomas Hildebrandt, Judith Koslofsky, David Stroehlein, Christie Cotty, Deborah Waring, Patricia Jones, John Lanphear, Laurie Sponza, Craig Couvopoulo, Timothy O’Keefe,Shahin Ahdieh, Kimberly Hess,Matthew Ross, Thomas Naccarato and George Deabold. A few old friends renewed their memberships too, and we are glad to see you are back with us. Please remind your friends that have not renewed their membership that they will not be receiving a newsletter until they send that check!

Annual dues are $35. Please send a check payable to LIBC to Conni Still at 82 Stephen Road, Bayport, NY 11705, use PAYPAL, or pay directly at the next meeting.

Please remember that dues were by end of March to remain a member in good standing. Please mail your check or pay online using PAYPAL.
Any member who has not paid their dues will not receive future newsletters nor have free advertising in future newsletters so please pay promptly. Also please update your copy for your ads.

Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: March 2015



Last Sunday was the first day the snow in my back yard was soft enough to attempt a visit to my hives. Just as a precaution I used a walker to make sure I didn’t slip on underlying ice and donning a veil and optimistically putting slices of fondant in my pockets I ventured out. The temperature had reached a little over 50 degrees and as I approached the hives much to my delight I saw activity. And when I got up to them, there were bees flying actively and there was spots of yellow bee poop all over the white snow surrounding the hives. I opened them up and there was still fondant left and bees spilling out. I gave them the extra fondant, welcomed them to a new year, and did a happy dance all the way back to the house. Now I will continue to feed them and monitor the need for a super as soon as the temperature stabilizes a little more and the dandelions start to bloom!

Our meeting last month was filled with many new faces and lots of old faces that we hadn’t seen in a while. It was good to see you all. We welcome new members:Nancy Hall, Peter Treiber, Mark & Marianne Sunderland, Nick Cacoperdo, Jeremy Jones, Dorothy Gorecki, Scott Brown, Chris Algieri, Philip Scala, Eileen Aivaliotis and family. Thanks to the other members who have sent their membership renewals by mail and PayPal.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: February 2015



Saint Gobnait, Patron Saint of Bees and Beekeepers

Gobnait (Gobnet, Gobhnet, Gobnaid, Gobnata, or Gobnatae), was born in County Clare, Ireland, sometime in the 5th or 6th century. Gobnait is Irish for Abigail (“Brings Joy”). As the patron saint of beekeepers, her name also has been anglicized as Deborah, meaning “Honey Bee.”

Monasteries and oratories in Gobnait’s time would have resembled stone beehives. A Clochán is dry-stone hut with a corbelled roof, dating from the early Middle Ages or earlier. Most archaeologists think these structures were built on the southwestern coast of Ireland since the Bronze Age. An “Oratory” was a small stone Church for reading the Gospels aloud (all 150 Psalms were memorized for use in their daily prayer: praying the hours). Many of the Oratories were only large enough to hold twelve people—the number of monks considered optimal in early Irish monasteries. Some later Monastic communities had hundreds of monks—and their families! Some of the Celtic Monasteries allowed married monks—the position of Abbot sometimes even passing from father to son.
One of the miracles attributed to Saint Gobnait was that she protected a parish by unleashing a swarm of bees. She was also known for her care of the sick. One story tells how she kept the plague out of the village of Ballyvourney in Ireland by designating it consecrated ground. Saint Gobnait’s Day is February 11th is still celebrated by the community of Ballyvourney, in County Cork. During a Mass at the well, everyone takes water from it. She had a strong relationship with bees and used the properties of honey in the treatment of illness and healing of wounds.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

ESHPA Summer Picnic Meeting

The Summer meeting of Empire State Honey Producers is going to be at Betterbee in Greenwich, NY on July 18. There will be three presentations on wintering honey bees. One on wrapping a cluster of four hives on a pallet, second on indoor wintering, third by Betterbee on their method. The meeting will start about 9 am, end by 4 PM. There will be a picnic lunch.
http://www.eshpa.org/index.php/calendar-b/summer-meeting

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: January 2015



Just two weeks ago I was sitting on my new deck having a cup of coffee and watching my bees come and go on cleansing flights. I hope they got back into their clusters before the temperature plummeted again. I am looking forward to the Spring and being able to enjoy watching the bees from this new vantage point. The entire kitchen was demo’d down to the studs and I can’t wait till the reno is done. All my bee “stuff” is packed up and I discovered that I had a few duplicates. So keep watch at the next few meetings because I will be bringing some things in for the raffles. I’m getting pretty tired of eating frozen TV dinners from the microwave, can’t wait for a real kitchen again. Will post picture hopefully next month.

We welcome some new members this month. Richard and Susan Barkey, Joseph Desiderio, Ernest Herrington, Mark Katzenberger, Martin Kenna, Elizabeth Marcellus, Karen May, Bryan Pedigo, Keith Perry, Arlene Verante.

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Holiday Party recognizes our Master Beekeepers, Fred Munzer, Peter Bizzoso, Richard Blohm and Ray Lackey.
Not present were John Moloney and Max Riedener.


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A festive bee trimmed cake for our Holiday Party.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

President’s Message: Our Club's Website in 2014

By George B. Schramm, LIBC President

I'm happy to report that our Club's website has been as busy as a, well, you know.

From January 1 of 2014 to January 1 of this year we've had 18,973 visits to the website (that’s right – over 18,000 hits!). Out of those visitors 13,355 were first-time visitors and the remaining 5,618 were people who came back for another look. That's an average of about 36 new visitors to the website every day. Our best day last year was on May 14 when we had 124 visitors.

Overall, about 71% of the visitors are first-timers and 29% are returning visitors. That's a good ratio because it means that we have lots of people finding their way to the site and having a look around, and a consistent number of people (most likely members) are coming back. Of those people returning to the site, 23% of them have been back 2 to 8 times previously and 6% have visited 9 times or more. (74 people have visited the site over 200 times each!)

Although the majority of our visitors come from the United States (95%), we do get visitors from all over the world. About 1% of visitors are from the United Kingdom, another 1% are from Brazil, and the remaining 3% are from various locations everywhere else, like Australia (28 visitors) and Italy (40 visitors).

So, how do visitors find our website? Well, about 17% of them have the website saved as a favorite and click directly to the site. About 11% get referred to the Club's website by another website, like Facebook (yes, the Club has a Facebook page) or other sites like beeculture.com. The remaining 72% of our visitors arrive after using a search engine like Google, Bing, or Yahoo. I intentionally embed into the website keywords that allow search engines to return our website high on a list of search results. You can try it for yourself: perform a Google search for "long island beekeepers" or "long island bees" or "long island honey." Most likely the Club's website appears on the first page of the search results.

The most popular pages on the website, other than the home page that people arrive at first, are the "Local Honey" page (if you don’t have your honey listed on this page then you’re probably missing out on potential sales), the "Classifieds", the "Meeting Schedule" page, and the "Bee Trouble" page.

You're probably wondering how we get all this information. I suppose I could just say that a little bee told me, but that wouldn’t be accurate. Hidden inside the website is a little program that gathers data about each visitor. That information is relayed to a database that collects and analyzes it all, and I periodically run reports to see how the website is performing. There's even more information available other than what I've summarized here. For example, not surprisingly, more and more people are using mobile technology to view the website: 27% have used a mobile phone and 17% have used a tablet. Nonetheless, we can't, and would not, gather names, addresses, or other personal information from our visitors.

If you have questions or comments about the Club's website, feel free to send me an email: president@longislandbeekeepers.org

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: December 2014



Welcome to the new members: Elizabeth Marcellus, Richard & Susan Barkey, Keith Perry & Arlene Verante, Bryan Pedigo, Martin Kenna
Finally got my garage (honey house) cleaned up and all the buckets ready for next year. Next I have to make a few more batches of cosmetic products and then clean off the entire work counter. My kitchen renovation includes bringing the old cabinets down and putting them under the work bench instead of the saw horses that have been there forever. That will give me much more usable and neat space. Hopefully it can all be done before the weather gets nasty and I want to get the car into the garage!! Guess I’m not going to get much decorating for Christmas this year. Wreath on the door might be all I can do, I have to pack up my 100 skeps that are in my kitchen! My Bee Christmas tree in the dining room will have to do double duty for Santa this year. My bees and I wish you and all your loved ones a Happy and Healthy Holiday and New Year.

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Congratulations to Tim Perry, winner of the Top Bar Hive Raffle!

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Guest Speaker Chis Kohl of Sweet Valley Hives with his Warre Hive.



Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

FROM THE EDITORS DESK: November 2014



Welcome to the new members: John Lovett, George Yakaboski, Daniel Messina and Kimberly Fitzgerald.

Blue Ribbon Winning Recipes:
Apple, Ginger, Honey Jelly, Conni Still
1 cup prepared apple juice, (used juicer to obtain juice from apples)
3 cups honey
1 tablespoonful grated ginger
½ bottle Certo pectin

Measure juice into saucepan. Add honey and mix well. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. At once stir in ginger, then Certo. Then bring to a FULL ROLLING BOIL and boil hard for 1 minute stirring constantly. Remove from heat, skim off foam with metal spoon and pour quickly into glass jars. Cover at once and seal according to Ball jar directions. Makes about 5 medium jars.

Local Raspberry-Honey Cello, John Hardecker
2 quarts raspberries
1 quart 190 proof grain alcohol (Everclear)
3 cups honey
Soak raspberries and alcohol.
Mix and strain to remove solids.
Add honey.


Do you have a beekeeping story to tell or information or pictures you would like to share with fellow beekeepers? Please send text and pictures to the editor of Beeline at this email address: Connistill@aol.com

Honey & Hive Products Judging Results

Our honey judging contest was a lively affair as usual. Thanks to the judges Ray Lackey and Donal Peterson for all their hard work.

Honey
Very Light, Water White
First, Bill O’Hern
Second, Moira Alexander
Third, John Hardecker

Very Light Amber
First, Charles DiStefano
Second,Helen Mecagni
Third, Giuseppe Caso

Light Amber
First, Roy Baillard
Second, Jessica James
Third, Moira Alexander

Amber
First, John Hardecker
Second, Charles DiStefano

Dark Amber
First, Miriam Kissel
Second, Peter Kissel

Dark
First, Helen Mecagni
Second, Giuseppe Caso

Comb Honey
First, Conni Still

Wax
Wax Block
First, Charles DiStefano

Novelty Beeswax Blocks
First, Conni Still

Photography
First, Barbara Curtis

Honey Bread
First, Betty Fletcher

Honey Spread
First, Betty Fletcher

Apple, Ginger, Honey Jelly
First, Conni Still

Raspberry Honey Cello
First, John Hardecker

Mead
First, John Hardecker

Gift Basket
First, Conni Still

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Club Correspondence: Letters to the Hive

Dear Long Island Bee Club,
We would like to thank you for supplying us with the bees we’re using to conduct our study. This donation helped us to acquire the necessary samples very easily and quickly, which allowed us to start our research as soon as possible. Also, we were able to collect a large variety of bees from one central location instead of having to drive to different areas, which helped tremendously. We will be sure to send you the results of our study once we are finished so you can see that your bees were used purposefully.

Thanks again,
Zack Abrams and Nicole LaReddola, Commack High School
letter11-2014-1

_____________________________________________________________________

Dear Long Island Bee Club,
We would like to thank all of you for participating in our project! We couldn't have gone through with this project without the generosity of all of your donations. We aim to put these bees to good use, and contribute something great to the beekeeping world!

Sincerely,
Jungsoo Ahn, Kristin Orrach, Sydney Sirota, and the rest of the Commack High School Science Department
letter11-2014-2

_____________________________________________________________________

Dear Conni,
I cannot make next Sunday's meeting but just wanted to thank the board for a wonderful conference! I learned so much and it was terrific to meet so many beekeepers. Clearly it was a lot of work to put together. Thank you so much for your efforts!

Paul Romanelli

The Garden Column: Late Fall

By Juergen Jaenicke, MG
(Courtesy Cornell Cooperative Extension)

(These are all just SUGGESTIONS from CCE)
Don't go crazy!!

• Finish planting bulbs for spring flowering.
• Spray woody ornamentals browsed by deer with repellent
• Protect newly planted tree trunks with thin barks from winter sun scald (freeze-thaw cracking) by winding them with paper tree wrap.
• Practice water-wise irrigation as needed until the ground freezes.
• Water those thirsty evergreens well into the winter whenever the ground isn't frozen. ( I always leave a well-insulated water tap open, just for that purpose).
• Drain and store hoses and irrigation lines.
• If desired, allow dead annuals to self-seed by keeping their flower stems intact.
• Leave seed heads from native perennials intact to provide visual interest and feed the birds.
• Finish removing leaf litter from diseased plants to reduce overwintering of disease in soil.
• After the ground freezes, mulch planting beds to protect perennials, especially newly planted ones and bulbs from frost heave.
• Leave ornamental grass leaves intact to protect their crowns from freezing.
• Continue composting deadheaded flowers and plant debris, but don't put weed seed heads in the compost pile.
• Collect raked leaves in a convenient place for adding "browns" year-round to the compost pile.
• Continue to remediate soil in garden beds with manure and compost to revitalize it this winter.
• Increase the humidity available to houseplants by misting them frequently or placing them on a tray of wet pebbles.
• Pot up spring bulbs for indoor forcing and make room for them in the refrigerator. (most avid gardeners have an old fridge in their shed or garage for that purpose).
• Do the final mowing of your lawn to less than two inches, this will reduce vole and mice activity.
• After aerating your rose beds and the first good frost, hill up soil into 10-12-inch mounds around each rose plants.
• Store terra-cotta pots indoors ( a cool place is fine) to protect them from freezing and breaking during the winter.
• Remove plant supports and stakes so you don't trip over them in the snow.